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Here are All of The Calories You’re Probably Going to Eat on Christmas Day

Here are All of The Calories You’re Probably Going to Eat on Christmas Day



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Excuse us, how many calories was Christmas dinner?!

During the holidays, we have a nasty habit of allowing ourselves a free pass on our diets. Granted, everyone deserves a treat now and then, but on holidays our “free pass” often turns into destructive overeating. Allowing ourselves to have a “little” of everything actually results in a pretty hefty calorie count — not to mention the sugar and fat! So before you head to your final holiday party, check out these common holiday foods and their calories counts so you can make smarter and more long-term fulfilling decisions.

APPETIZERS:

· Pigs in a Blanket: 66 calories a serving

· Potato Chips: 160 calories per 15 chips

· Guacamole: 91 calories per ¼ cup

· Potential Total: 317 Calories

DINNER:

· Ham, shank, with bone, roasted: 155 calories per 3 ounces

· Christmas Goose: 340.3 Calories per serving from 1-pound goose

· Turkey (3½ ounces turkey) Dark meat with skin: 232 calories

· Turkey Gravy: 100 calories per 1 cup

· Baked Potato: 194 calories per one baked potato

· Green Bean Casserole: 230 calories per 1 cup

· Biscuit: 150 calories per biscuit

· Corn: 132 calories per ear

· Spinach: 41 calories per 1 cup

· Butter: 36 calories per 1 pat butter

Potential Total (Ham Dinner): 938 Calories

Potential Total (Dark Meat Turkey and Gravy Dinner): 1,115 Calories

Potential Total (Goose Dinner): 1,130.3 Calories

DESSERT:

· 3 Chocolate Chip Cookies: 78 calories per cookie (238 calories)

· 1 Sugar Cookie: 113 calories

· 1 Gingerbread Cookie, Iced: 78 Calories

· Candy Cane: 60 calories per piece

Potential Total: 329 Calories (One of each)

DRINKS:

· Milk: 130 calories per 8-fluid-ounce glass

· Eggnog: 230 calories per 1 cup

· Hot Cocoa: 218 calories per 1 cup

· White Wine: 121 calories per glass

· Red (Burgundy) Wine: 127 calories per glass

· Champagne: 78 calories per glass

· Beer (Regular): Average 150 calories per bottle

· Beer (Light): Average 95 calories per bottle

Potential Total: 1,304 calories (One of each)


High-Calorie Splurging Won’t Ruin Your Diet

Oct. 11, 2010 (San Diego) -- Did you splurge at the birthday party with a big piece of chocolate cake, driving your daily calorie total way above average? Don’t feel guilty, because you're likely to compensate later, resulting in a negligible net gain, a study shows.

It turns out our body's feedback system doesn't tally up calories in, calories out quite as precisely as some experts believe, says Kevin Hall, PhD, a physiologist at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who presented his findings at the Obesity Society meeting in San Diego.

''On a day to day basis, you can vary your food intake by plus or minus 600 calories a day and still have a stable body weight, as long as your long-term average [calorie intake] is not creeping up or down," Hall tells WebMD.


So how does IF work for weight loss, exactly?

&ldquoIntermittent fasting is about when you eat,&rdquo says Charlotte Martin, MS, RDN, CPT, owner of Shaped by Charlotte, LLC. &ldquoDepending on the IF approach, you&rsquore either shortening the eating window each day, or engaging in about 24-hour fasts one or more times a week.&rdquo One of the most popular approaches is the 16:8 method, which is when you fast for an eight-hour window, like from 8 p.m. to 12 p.m. the next day.

Essentially, by restricting your food intake to a shortened time window, you naturally decrease your caloric intake and, in turn, can lose weight. (Remember, weight loss, at the most basic level, happens when you consume fewer calories than you expend each day.) "Not only are you taking in fewer calories, but you&rsquore also slowing down your insulin pump, which may boost fat burn," explains Martin.


How many calories do I need a day?

Our software shows your calorie needs per day in kCal per day (or Calories per day, as it is often called in common language), which is the amount of calories you require if you want to preserve maintain your weight. If you want to lose weight or gain weight, we present you with estimates of the caloric intake needed to achieve a certain weight loss goal (or weight gain goal). It is based on the assumption that you will maintain your specified intensity of physical activity and that our estimate of its energy impact is approximately correct. Since these estimates are based on population averages, it is always a good idea to closely observe your weight and make adjustments as necessary.

General recommendations by Katch et al. suggest subtracting 500 kCal per day if your calorie requirement is estimated at below 3000 kCal, or subtracting 1000 kCal from your daily meals if it is higher.

Of course, both of these recommendations and the results from the calculator should be thought of as general guidelines only. You should always consult with a medical practitioner or a nutritionist, before going on a diet or making a significant change to your exercise routine.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ cup butter
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • ⅓ cup cream
  • 4 large apple - peeled, cored and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons cold butter
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Lightly butter an 8 inch square baking dish.

Sift together 1 1/2 cups of flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Cut in 1/2 cup of butter until the mixture is crumbly. Stir together the egg with the cream and gently mix into the flour until a soft dough has formed. Press into prepared baking dish. Layer the apples into the dish overlapping, in neat rows. Prepare streusel by mixing the brown sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, and cinnamon together in a small bowl. Cut in 2 tablespoons butter until the mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle over apples.

Bake in preheated oven until apples have softened, and topping has browned, about 25 minutes.


Sorry, keto fans, you’re probably not in ketosis

Deposit Photos

The diet gets billed as a miraculously enjoyable diet—eat all the fat you want, just cut out the carbs. But the ketogenic diet (also called keto) was never supposed to be fun. It was supposed to treat severe epilepsy. And as a medical treatment, it was only intended to be administered under the supervision of trained nutritionists and physicians. The professionals would be able to monitor patients for potential problems and ensure that their diet was actually keeping them in ketosis—a metabolic state where your body switches from using glucose as energy to using ketone bodies, which come from body fat. They needed those checkpoints because staying in true ketosis is exceptionally challenging for adults.

“It’s not so easy to get an adult body into ketosis,” says Teresa Fung, a professor of nutrition at Simmons College. “That’s why the keto diet is used as a treatment of epilepsy in children or infants—because it’s easier.” Kids are growing rapidly, she explains, so their use of food as fuel is different from the way adults use it. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what those differences are, but Fung says it’s so hard to get adults into deep ketosis (which is likely deeper than a dieter’s target) that often nutritionists don’t even attempt it as a therapy. It’s primarily kids who undergo the treatment today.

This is in part because patients need to be in deep ketosis to see an impact on epilepsy, likely deeper than the average dieter, but without a nutritionist guiding you it’s still hard to get down into ketosis. It’s not exactly clear why ketosis seems to improve epilepsy, but it seems to have something to do with the brain’s use of ketone bodies in place of glucose, which only happens when you’re nearly in starvation mode. (It’s important to note here that “starvation mode” is not in reference to how hungry you feel.)

“Keto is not easy to maintain, it’s not a palatable diet,” says Andrea Giancoli, a dietician and nutrition consultant in California. Getting 80-90 percent of your calories from fat—which is what’s generally required for keto—is actually difficult. It involves eating a lot of rich, heavy foods with little variety—think fatty meats and gravy on cauliflower. You’re only allowed 10 to 15 grams of carbohydrates per day, and though many dieters stretch that to more like 20 or 30 grams that’s still only about one banana. A single apple could also get you past that limit depending on its size (though the fiber in an apple means that many dieters don’t count those carbs towards their daily limit) and a couple slices of bread likely fulfill the requirement as well.

But the real problem isn’t going over your carb limit—it’s the protein. A therapeutic keto diet limits your protein intake “If you’re eating a lot of protein, you’re breaking that down into carbs,” Giancoli explains. Your body is in desperation mode on keto, she says, and without a reasonable supply of carbohydrates coming from grains and fruits, you’ll start breaking down the amino acids in proteins to make glucose. Glucose, though it sounds like a scary sugar, is your body’s primary source of fuel. Too much isn’t good for you, but you need some just to allow your cells to function normally.

The point of keto is to force your body to deplete its glucose (and the stored form, glycogen) so it will have to use body fat as a fuel source. It’s capable of making ketone bodies from your fat, which can replace glucose as an energy-storing molecule if necessary. To do that, you have to break apart fat molecules thus ‘burning’ the fat off. But here’s the thing: your body really really doesn’t want to run out of glucose. No glucose means starvation as far as it’s concerned—even if you’re not feeling hungry, your body is still missing one of its key macronutrients. And when you’re (nutritionally) starving, your body will start to break down protein just to get those sweet, sweet carbs. Of course, you have a source of protein in your body already: your own muscles. “When in starvation mode, your body breaks down muscle in your body,” says Giancoli. “Ketosis is a way of trying to preserve that protein. It’s not ideal, but it’s your body’s way of saving you.”

If you give your body any more than the absolute minimum amount of protein that it needs, it will immediately break it down into carbs. This is why keto sites often give a guideline for not eating too much protein. The problem is that there’s no one guideline that works for everyone, and without specifically tailoring keto to your body it’d be easy to accidentally ingest too much protein.

On the other hand, you can’t eat no protein. You need it to keep your muscles functioning and to build hair and nails and to manufacture hormones.

This is why epilepsy patients have to get prescribed diets from profession nutritionists. Without getting into true ketosis, dieters risk ingesting an enormous amount of fat—and potentially a lot of saturated fat, if you’re eating animal meat—without any of the fat-burning effects of ketosis. “The fat is the thing that’s problematic for a lot of people on keto,” Fung says. “They basically give a pass for any types of fat and a lot of the recipes encourage saturated fats like butter.” Dieters who are careful to focus on healthy, unsaturated fats like those in avocados may not have issues, but again Fung notes that you end up with a fairly monotonous diet that way, and thus a lot of people end up eating more saturated fats. “To me as a nutritionist, that’s pretty scary.”

Of course, ketosis itself comes with its own risks. Circulating ketone bodies make your blood too acidic, and your body will draw calcium from your bones as a buffer. This also happens in ketoacidosis, which is when you have so many ketone bodies that it becomes dangerous and will draw far more calcium out of your bones. Giancoli notes that dieters usually aren’t in such an extreme starvation mode that they develop ketoacidosis. There are few to no studies on healthy adults undertaking a non-therapeutic ketogenic diet, but studies of epileptic children on the diet show increased bone demineralization and high calcium levels in the blood.

The high fat content in the diet, especially if you’re eating saturated fats, can raise your cholesterol levels and contribute to developing cardiovascular disease. Without the fiber from whole grains and fruits, you’re also likely to get constipated and have other digestive issues. Plus you need fiber to maintain a health gut microbiome, which tends to come from the kind of whole grains that you can’t eat on the diet, and though it is possible to get enough fiber from vegetables on the keto diet you have to carefully monitor your eating to ensure that. Neither Giancoli nor Fung any of the other dietitians and nutritionists who evaluated keto for a recent US News & World Report diets ranking would recommend it. Many of them said they had serious concerns about long-term safety of doing keto. Though you may very well lose weight, most people on most diets gain the weight back (and sometimes even more) when they go off the diet, which many dieters do because radical shifts in what you eat are hard to maintain for long periods of time.

So maybe not being in ketosis isn’t so bad after all—now just cut back on the saturated fats.

Note: this article has been updated

Sara Chodoshis an associate editor at PopSci where she writes about everything from vaccine hesitancy to extreme animal sex. She got her master's degree in science journalism at NYU's Science Health and Environmental Reporting Program, and is getting a second master's in data visualization from the University of Girona. Contact the author here.


How Many Calories Do You Need?

Many people seek to lose weight, and often the easiest way to do this is to consume fewer calories each day. But how many calories does the body actually need in order to be healthy? This largely depends on the amount of physical activity a person performs each day, and regardless of this, is different for all people &ndash there are many different factors involved, not all of which are well-understood or known.

Some factors that influence the number of calories a person needs to remain healthy include age, weight, height, sex, levels of physical activity, and overall general health. For example, a physically active 25-year-old male that is 6 feet in height requires considerably higher calorie intake than a 5-foot-tall, sedentary 70-year-old woman. Though it differs depending on age and activity level, adult males generally require 2,000-3000 calories per day to maintain weight while adult females need around 1,600-2,400 according to the U.S Department of Health.

The body does not require many calories to simply survive. However, consuming too few calories results in the body functioning poorly, since it will only use calories for functions essential to survival, and ignore those necessary for general health and well-being. Harvard Health Publications suggests women get at least 1,200 calories and men get at least 1,500 calories a day unless supervised by doctors. As such, it is highly recommended that a person attempting to lose weight monitors their body's caloric necessities and adjusts it as necessary to maintain its nutritional needs.


How to Burn Off Calories From Your Favorite Holiday Foods and Drinks

It’s the holidays, so let’s be real: You’re probably going to indulge a bit, whether it’s through alcohol, eggnog, or carb-heavy side dishes. And while some of your friends and gym buddies might be giving you slack for ingesting more added sugar in one day than you normally do in a month, we here at Muscle & Fitness see nothing wrong with celebrating (within reason). We’ve preached the benefits, both mental and physical, of having your favorite foods without feeling guilty for it.

Thankfully, treating yourself doesn’t have to hurt your gains. There are ways you can have an extra side of stuffing without struggling to stuff yourself into your jeans the next morning. And we’re not even talking bench presses or deadlifts here—we’ll outline how to “delete” your treats with just a few minutes of walking (feel free to do that in between the main course and dessert, or if you need a quick getaway from your conspiracy theory uncle).

In this article, we’ve listed five different classic holiday foods alongside a workout you can do to burn off the calories.


The HCG Diet

Shutterstock

Run, don't walk, away from the HCG diet, a meal plan that consists of just 500 calories a day and supplements or injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)—the hormone that is produced by women during pregnancy—several times a week. "People do lose weight on this diet, but it's really because they're eating such a small amount of calories a day," points out Nieves. "This type of diet is not sustainable, because who's going to be able to eat such a small amount of food for long periods of time?" Additionally, it's dangerous! Eating so little will lower your metabolism, making it harder to reach a healthy weight in the long-run. It also puts you at risk for malnutrition, can trigger eating disorders, and lead to muscle and tissue loss, "especially in vital organs such as the heart, since the body starts using its protein as energy under starvation conditions." Also, she points out, that the hCG hormone has only been approved as part of fertility treatments—not weight loss. "Only small studies have been done so far on the efficacy of using hCG for weight loss, using small sample sizes," she explains. "We don't have enough evidence of the potential health risks of using this hormone, nor whether it really works for weight loss."


What Is Intermittent Fasting?

As you may have figured from its name, intermittent fasting weight loss is a diet plan where you set fasting periods during the day. This is usually between 16-20 consecutive hours, but it can be as little as 12 hours or as much as 24 hours (or even 36 hours).

While fasting you can eat and drink low calorie or calorie-free foods. Think coffee, tea, water, and vegetables.

The more time you spend fasting every day, the better your results. You can do these fasts as often as you like. Again, the more often you do so, the better [1] .


Learning About Calories

When people talk about the calories in food, what do they mean? A calorie is a unit of measurement &mdash but it doesn't measure weight or length. A calorie is a unit of energy. When you hear something contains 100 calories, it's a way of describing how much energy your body could get from eating or drinking it.

Are Calories Bad for You?

Calories aren't bad for you. Your body needs calories for energy. But eating too many calories &mdash and not burning enough of them off through activity &mdash can lead to weight gain.

Most foods and drinks contain calories. Some foods, such as lettuce, contain few calories (1 cup of shredded lettuce has less than 10 calories). Other foods, like peanuts, contain a lot of calories (½ cup of peanuts has over 400 calories).

Some people watch their calories if they are trying to lose weight. Most kids don't need to do this, but all kids can benefit from eating a healthy, balanced diet that includes the right number of calories &mdash not too many, not too few. But how do you know how many calories you need?

How Many Calories Do Kids Need?

Kids come in all sizes and each person's body burns energy (calories) at different rates, so there isn't one perfect number of calories that every kid should eat. But there is a recommended range for most kids between 6 and 12 years old: 1,600 to 2,200 per day, depending on how active they are.

When they reach puberty, girls need more calories than before, but they tend to need fewer calories than boys. As boys enter puberty, they may need as many as 2,500 to 3,000 calories per day, especially if they are very active. But whether they are girls or boys, kids who are active and move around a lot need more calories than kids who don't.

If you eat more calories than you need, the body changes extra calories to fat. Too much fat can lead to being overweight and other health problems. Only your doctor can say if you are overweight, so check with him or her if you're concerned. And never go on a diet without talking to your doctor!.

High-calorie foods &mdash such as sugary sodas, candy, and fast food &mdash quickly add up to too many calories. Instead, eat a healthy, balanced diet. Exercising and playing are really important, too, because physical activity burns calories.

How the Body Uses Calories

Your body needs calories just to operate &mdash to keep your heart beating and your lungs breathing. As a kid, your body also needs calories and nutrients from a variety of foods to grow and develop. And you burn off some calories without even thinking about it &mdash by walking your dog or making your bed.

But it is a great idea to play and be active for an 1 hour or more every day. That means time spent playing sports, playing outside, or riding your bike. It all adds up. Being active every day keeps your body strong and can help you maintain a healthy weight.

Watching TV and playing video games won't burn many calories at all, which is why you should limit those activities to no more than 2 hours per day. A person burns only about 1 calorie per minute while watching TV, about the same as sleeping!