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Hopster's Brew & Boards Gives Patrons a Hands-On Beer Making Experience

Hopster's Brew & Boards Gives Patrons a Hands-On Beer Making Experience

Who hasn’t ever dreamt of creating their own beer? If you have sipped on that hoppy little drink and thought you could create something better, now is your chance at Hopster’s Brew & Boards located in Newton Centre. Here, craft beer lovers can try their hand at the brewing process whether they are a beginning brewer or an experienced master, Hopster’s guarantees a fun experience.

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To start, you’d determine which type of beer you’d prefer to brew, like a light bodied lager or the hoppier taste of an IPA. Be sure to choose one that you like though since patrons leave with nearly three cases of the new creation.

On hand are professional brewers as well to assist with the creation from start to finish. Our guides, Brent and Tom, showed us to our kettle where we filled the tank with water and reviewed a series of 30 recipes that ranged from ambers and reds to lagers and stouts. We decided to create a hop meal double IPA. Each recipe tells you exactly what ingredients are needed and the requested amounts of barley, hops and malt.

After heading into the adjacent Ingredients Room to stock up on a pound of local organic milled grains, the steeping process began. Next up, we combined the liquid malt, hops, Irish moss and yeast with the organic grains using the filtered water in the kettle and brought the mixture to a boil for an hour.

Then it was time to have some fun. Hopster’s has a full bar with 20 craft beers on tap so guests can relax while they wait with a cold beverage like the Plum Island Belgian white or Riot IPA. They even offer some light snacks while you wait, including a charcuterie plate of Bierwurst, country pâté, chorizo with blue cheese and fiddlehead tomme. The crispy mushroom flatbread is delicious and hearty enough to share between two guests. It comes topped with squash, goat cheese and scallions.

After snacking, it’s time to cool down the beer to room temperature, which is done in their heat exchanger to prepare it for the fermenting process. When it hits 70 degrees, the yeast is then added. The folks at Hopster’s will then assist in transferring your beer into an air-sealed container where it will sit and ferment for 10 days. Once it’s ready, it will be transfer into a keg to prepare for bottling when you come back in and bottle and label your own beer.

Approximately two to three weeks after the brewing process, we returned for our bottling appointment. Be sure to email over any personalized artwork prior to your visit so they may print out labels before you arrive. Allow about an hour for bottling. During this time, brewers will use Hopster’s simple equipment to pour and cap each bottle by hand.

If you have some youngsters, who have an interest in creating their own recipes, Hopster’s also offers recipes for root beer and ginger ale.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


30 Best Breweries in the Midwest

Creative, local artisanal beers are pushing norms, creating regional beer culture, and exploring different taste profiles.

This is what craft brewing is all about. The craft brewing movement in the United States can be traced back to the mid 1960s, when Anchor brewing was brought out of imminent closure and new character began evolving in brewers. Small-scale, home brewing operations became popular pastimes for novice brewers, who started to make some truly tasty beers.

As the excitement to taste, create, and talk beer began to bloom, brewing supply shops became neighborhood hubs to gather and trade techniques. Some home brewers began to think of the viability of turning their weekend obsessions into a full-fledged career. With business plans, start-up funds, and often flying by the seats of their pants, small breweries began popping up, each with its own identity, taste, and charisma.

The craft brewing community became stronger and rallied around their favorite breweries. Cross country or cross state line pilgrimages were made to try different beers. This was a chance for enthusiasts to meet the brewmaster, see production, taste the beer (and even the pre-beer ingredients), and engage in the quirk and creative spectrum of each brewery.

Craft brewing is all about the evolution of their signature beer. For independent breweries, knowing when to expand and when to slow down, who their brewery’s consumer is, and having a bit of luck all factor into their success. Some microbreweries swear they will stay small, until demand exceeds their capacity. Some small breweries find that working with other like-minded crafters gives them the most growth potential.

Still others catch the eye of the major beer companies, who in recent years have seen the earning potentials of bringing craft breweries under their brand umbrellas. In this list, we have chosen brands who have remained majority independent. Craft breweries by definition are majority independently owned operations producing under 6 million barrels each year. Microbreweries are fully independent and have less than a 15,000 barrel production each year.

Midwesterners know beer. And they love it. With hops and wheat and other brew resources being grown literally in their backyards, the close-knit relationship to brewing and crafting is intense. There is something about midwestern culture and the celebratory nature of beer drinking that naturally fits and complement each other.

Local midwestern brewers take a lot of pride in their brewing techniques and their neighbors and community. They also value the hard work, steely determination, and grit that is inherent to success in the brewing industry. Small businesses and craft products do well with the rallying spirit that Midwestern culture embodies. Here are the top 30 craft and micro breweries from the Midwest.


Watch the video: THE BEST HOMEBREWING SETUP (December 2021).