Latest recipes

Ginger Spice Cake with Dried Cherries

Ginger Spice Cake with Dried Cherries

Bake this festive spice cake in your favorite Bundt pan or pudding bowl, or feel free to use an 8" springform pan. You can top the cake with Luscious Chocolate Icing (see recipe) or simply dust it with powdered sugar.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour plus more for pan
  • 1 cup dried tart cherries (about 6 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated peeled ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup hot espresso or very strong coffee
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (packed) dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup mild-flavored (light) molasses
  • Luscious Chocolate Icing (optional; click for recipe)

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Butter Bundt pan. Dust pan with flour, tapping out excess. Combine cherries, crystallized ginger, grated ginger, and Dijon mustard in a medium bowl. Pour espresso over cherry mixture and set aside. Whisk 2 1/2 cups flour, ground ginger, baking soda, salt, allspice, cinnamon, and pepper in a large bowl.

  • Using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat 1/2 cup butter in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add brown sugar and beat for 2 minutes. Beat in eggs one at a time, then beat in molasses.

  • Strain cherry mixture into a small bowl, reserving soaking liquid. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture in 3 additions, alternately with soaking liquid in 2 additions, beating to blend between additions. Fold in drained cherry mixture. Scrape batter into prepared pan.

  • Bake until top of cake springs back when lightly pressed in the middle, about 1 hour. Let cool in pan on a wire rack. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

  • Remove cake from pan. Spoon Luscious Chocolate Icing over cake, if using, allowing it to drip down sides. Cut cake into wedges to serve.

Recipe by Christopher Hirsheimer, Melissa Hamilton,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 420 Fat (g) 22 Saturated Fat (g) 6 Cholesterol (mg) 90 Carbohydrates (g) 78 Dietary Fiber (g) 1 Total Sugars (g) 43 Protein (g) 5 Sodium (mg) 620Reviews Section

Brandied Dried Fruit

Christopher Testani for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

The complex layers of flavor that develop from combining dried fruit, citrus, spices and brandy are the reward for an investment of time. And time does most of the work in this recipe, which produces brandied fruit that you can use in an array of dishes and drinks: A two-day soak will get you a fine infusion, but go for the full 14 to extract notes from each component. The spices need time to bloom, and the dried fruit skins plump as they are infused, absorbing the citrus’s bite and the brandy’s warmth. Use the fruit mixture in scones, cocktails and braised lamb. Or stir the drained fruit into muffin or cake batter, toss with bulkier fruit like apples or pears for use as a filling for hand pies, or serve as a relish to accompany lamb, pork or chicken. As an added bonus, the fruit mixture keeps in the refrigerator for months. Store in an airtight container and avoid adding any moisture to the jar by using only dry utensils to serve.


Irish Dessert Recipes – Spice Cake

St. Patrick is credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland. Legend explains that he explained the Holy Trinity by using the shamrock or three-leaf clover to represent the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

This is a traditional Irish dessert that has no food coloring or artificial ingredients. Give your family the chance to try a real Irish dessert this year.

When looking for Irish desserts, there is no reason to search for a “green” dessert. Traditional St. Patrick’s Day desserts were not colored green. This Irish Spice Cake is one I remember from my childhood.

It is a moist cake or bread that works well for breakfast or as a dessert topped with freshly whipped cream. And, it’s one of our favorite healthy Irish dessert recipes.

Spice breads were typically heavy, moist breads that kept well wrapped in the pantry. They did not dry out as quickly as other breads which made them quite popular.

While this recipe calls for raisins, you could easily substitute dried cherries, dried cranberries, dates or figs instead if that is what you have in your pantry.

I love that this is a healthy dessert made from whole ingredients. You can add sliced fresh fruit to the top along with the whipped cream if you like.

This is one of those Irish dessert recipes that could be made throughout the year and topped with whatever fruit is in season in your area when you make it. It’s a wonderfully dense cake recipe with an amazing taste.

I hope you have a chance to try it.

More Irish dessert recipes

I would love to try a few more Irish cakes this year. And, I have heard that Irish Apple Cake and Irish Tea Cake are both delicious and relatively easy to make. Of course, scones and bread pudding are also fairly traditional Irish desserts to make. But, I have made them several times in the past.

You can try my cranberry walnut scones recipe. Or, if you like bread pudding, you can try my spiced pumpkin bread pudding and my bread pudding with praline topping.

These are all family favorites at my house.

What are your favorite Irish dessert recipes to have for St. Patrick’s Day? Have you tried any of the recipes I’ve mentioned before?

More St. Patrick’s Day articles

If you’re looking for more St. Patrick’s Day fun, why not try these:


RICH FRUIT CAKE

The Rich Fruit Cake is full of fruit flavours. And converts to a star-rated celebration cake by decorating the perimeter of the cake with blanched whole almonds before baking.

Prep Time

12hrs for fruit to soak plus 30-40 minutes

Cook Time

Makes

Ingredients

100g Buderim Ginger Glacé Ginger or Naked Ginger, finely chopped
125g raisins, chopped in half
125g sultanas
80g currants
50g glacé cherries, cut in half
100mL cream or sweet sherry
1 1/4 cups unbleached or regular plain flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon mixed spice
125g butter
125g firmly packed dark brown or dark muscovado sugar
3 x 59g eggs, lightly beaten
30g slivered almond roughly chopped
Decoration [optional] 60g [40 almonds] whole blanched almond

Method

  • You need to begin cake night before baking. In a bowl or plastic bag place Glacé Ginger or Naked Ginger, dried fruits, cherries and sherry. Stir or massage to combine, cover bowl or secure plastic bag and leave to soak for 12 hours.
  • Carefully butter or grease a 20cm round or square cake pan. Line only the base with a disc of non stick baking paper.
  • Preheat oven to slow [150°C].
  • Sift together flour, baking powder and spice.
  • In a large bowl cream butter and sugar until soft, creamy and fluffy.
  • Add eggs, a portion at a time, beating well after each addition. If mixture starts to curdle, add about 1 tablespoon of flour mixture.
  • Fold in flour mixture. Finally, stir in soaked fruit mixture and chopped almonds, mix gently until well combined.
  • Spoon mixture into prepared cake pan. If desired arrange blanched whole almonds around perimeter of cake pressing down very gently, otherwise they will disappear on baking!
  • Bake in preheated oven for 3 to 3½ hour or until when cake is tested with a fine cake skewer and it comes out clean. Cool on wire cake rack for 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan and place on cake rack to finish cooling.

Helpful Notes

A standard Australian Metric 250ml cup & 20mL tablespoon measuring sets are used


RICH FRUIT CAKE

The Rich Fruit Cake is full of fruit flavours. And converts to a star-rated celebration cake by decorating the perimeter of the cake with blanched whole almonds before baking.

Prep Time

12hrs for fruit to soak plus 30-40 minutes

Cook Time

Makes

Ingredients

100g Buderim Ginger Glacé Ginger or Naked Ginger, finely chopped
125g raisins, chopped in half
125g sultanas
80g currants
50g glacé cherries, cut in half
100mL cream or sweet sherry
1 1/4 cups unbleached or regular plain flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon mixed spice
125g butter
125g firmly packed dark brown or dark muscovado sugar
3 x 59g eggs, lightly beaten
30g slivered almond roughly chopped
Decoration [optional] 60g [40 almonds] whole blanched almond

Method

  • You need to begin cake night before baking. In a bowl or plastic bag place Glacé Ginger or Naked Ginger, dried fruits, cherries and sherry. Stir or massage to combine, cover bowl or secure plastic bag and leave to soak for 12 hours.
  • Carefully butter or grease a 20cm round or square cake pan. Line only the base with a disc of non stick baking paper.
  • Preheat oven to slow [150°C].
  • Sift together flour, baking powder and spice.
  • In a large bowl cream butter and sugar until soft, creamy and fluffy.
  • Add eggs, a portion at a time, beating well after each addition. If mixture starts to curdle, add about 1 tablespoon of flour mixture.
  • Fold in flour mixture. Finally, stir in soaked fruit mixture and chopped almonds, mix gently until well combined.
  • Spoon mixture into prepared cake pan. If desired arrange blanched whole almonds around perimeter of cake pressing down very gently, otherwise they will disappear on baking!
  • Bake in preheated oven for 3 to 3½ hour or until when cake is tested with a fine cake skewer and it comes out clean. Cool on wire cake rack for 30 minutes, and then remove cake from cake pan and place on cake rack to finish cooling.

Helpful Notes

A standard Australian Metric 250ml cup & 20mL tablespoon measuring sets are used


Ginger recipes

Browse through our glorious collection of ginger recipes, including Robert Thompson's pineapple and ginger cake, Shaun Hill's monkfish with ginger and Simon Haigh's gingerbread soufflé.

Ginger is one of the most diverse spices around, with ginger recipes running the gamut from sweet ginger biscuits to savoury lentil dal. The gnarly ginger root has a fiery taste and can be purchased fresh, ground, pickled, crystalised or preserved in syrup.

Native to India and China, fresh ginger is a staple in Asian cuisine. Try Alan Muchison's easy Thai fish recipe, served with a fragrant broth seasoned with fresh ginger and lemongrass. You'll also find fresh ginger readily used in Indian recipes, such as Paul Heathcote's vegetable curry and Alfred Prasad's potato curry with fresh fine beans. Fresh ginger can also add notable zing to sweet recipes. Try it with roasted rhubarb, as in Nathan Outlaw's rhubarb trifle recipe.

Ground ginger is very handy for sweet ginger recipes like cakes and biscuits. Martin Wishart's gingerbread recipe and Josh Eggleton's ginger snap biscuits are classic examples. Or try adding ginger to a crumble topping as Marcus Wareing does in his apple crumble recipe, baked on a shortbread base and served in slices.


Chocolate fruit flapjack

Chocolate fruit flapjack. Photograph: Jonathan Lovekin for the Observer

MAKES 12
walnut pieces 30g
pistachio nuts 40g
soft-dried figs 70g
dried cherries 40g
pumpkin seeds 50g
porridge or rolled oats 200g
ground almonds 35g
butter 100g
caster sugar 80g
maple syrup 80ml

dark chocolate 150g

You will also need:
a non-stick baking tin about 24cm square

Set the oven at 160C/gas mark 3. Put the walnuts, pistachios, figs, cherries and pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Blitz to a rough mixture. Stir in the porridge oats and the ground almonds.

Melt the butter in a pan, add the sugar and maple syrup. When it comes to a rolling boil, tip in the dry ingredients, stir thoroughly and tip into the baking tin. Press the mixture down firmly then bake for 20-25 minutes.

Press the bars down firmly as they cool, cutting them into 12 small bars.

Melt the chocolate over simmering water. Dip the bars into the chocolate, leaving some of biscuit uncovered.


35 of the Best Ways to Update Grandma's Favorite Recipes

We dug deep in our archives to upgrade some of our most delicious vintage dishes.

Just a few upgrades turned these dishes from the '40s and '50s into ones you'll want to make (and eat!) today.

Then: The tropical flavors that give hummingbird cake it's trademark taste hail from Jamaica. In the late 1970s, the Jamaica Tourist Board brought the fruit and spice cake to America&mdashand it's been a southern staple ever since.

Now: You can't visit a bakery in the south without indulging in a slice of this sweet and nutty cake. Hummingbird cupcakes have since made their debut&mdashthe same great flavor with less mess.

Then: This well-loved minty dessert is based off the créme de menthe cocktail, which became popular in the late 1800s. As the cocktail became a staple in American culture (especially around St. Patrick's Day because of it's green hue), people gave it a refresh by adding it to another household favorite: chocolate cake.

Today: While there's still a few folks who sip on Grasshoppers from time to time, Grasshopper pie&mdashor in this case, bars&mdashis a must-have for any gathering. The créme de menthe flavor still holds true but it's now sandwiched between layers of rich chocolate.

Then: The tradition of eating an oval or ring-shaped cake on the Christian holiday of the Epiphany dates back the Middle Ages. In 1870, the French brought this tradition to New Orleans but it wasn't until the 1970s that the famous fillings were added.

Today: Decades later, a tiny plastic baby is the prize. If you're the lucky one to get the baby in your cake slice (chew carefully!), then you are deemed "King" for the day. The cake is typically decorated in the traditional Mardi Gras colors: purple (for justice), green (for faith), and gold (for power).

Then: The Germans are said to be the ones who gifted the world these sugary-sweet doughnuts. While the filling flavors might have have differed, Berliners (the German term for jelly-filled doughnuts) came onto the scene in the early 1800's.

Today: While you can still pick up a dozen of these sweet treats at your local doughnut chain, these lemon poppy seed doughnuts are even better homemade. Add the jam of your choice for a truly customized breakfast treat (or snack).

Then: Hermit cookies, a spicy cookie packed with fruit and nuts, have been around for more than a century&mdashyes, really. There's even a hermit cookie recipe that dates back to 1896 from Fannie Farmer's "The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook." The traditional version that traveled around the country for decades featured raisins and nuts&mdashand that's about it.

Today: These chewy treats are as classic as fruit cake but are even better when you drizzle on the citrusy glaze and swap out raisins for other dried fruits including dried cherries.

Then: Made with cinnamon and crackers, but&mdashsurprise&mdashno apples, this copycat treat tastes exactly like the real thing. The earliest recipes date to the mid-1850s, when pioneers moved west, away from the eastern orchards.

Today: This dessert had a renaissance in the 1930s, when Nabisco began printing the recipe on boxes of Ritz Crackers. We kept the crackers and added a tangy raspberry-swirled whipped-yogurt topping to balance out the sweetness.

Then: This dessert dates to the 1800s, when a European physicist found that warm meringue insulated ice cream so it stayed cold. The sweet regained popularity in the U.S. in the 1950s, when Alaska became a state.

Today: We turned this into a no-bake treat by swapping out the time-consuming sponge cake base for a layer of ladyfingers soaked in melted lemon sorbet. For easier assembly, we used a loaf pan instead of a round mold.

Then: Boiling green onion, cabbage and celery together made the vegetables bland and mushy. The 1972 recipe included butter and MSG, a chemical additive that was used to boost flavor but is rarely found in today's recipes. Originally, the recipe called for raw pork, which was boiled until it became tough and tasteless.

Now: Assembling the soup in a jar and simply pouring boiling water over top of the ingredients keeps new additions like carrot, bok choy and snow peas colorful and crisp. Today, chili garlic sauce and fresh ginger season the dish, making it even tastier. Subbing in shredded rotisserie chicken cuts the cooking time while keeping the meat flavorful and juicy.

Then: The only vegetable used in the original filling was onion, which was boiled with beef to eke out as much flavor as possible. The mashed potatoes were made with evaporated milk&mdasha wartime staple still popular in the 1950s. Served in four individual casseroles, the early recipe took too much time and too many dishes.

Now: We sautéed the onion and beef instead, and tossed in tomatoes, carrots and a dash of cinnamon for extra flavor. We updated the potatoes by using tangy sour cream and milk for a smooth texture. We sped things up by serving it family-style in the same skillet used to cook the beef.

Then: This classic chocolate cookie recipe originally included flour. These cookies were coated with a layer of melted semisweet chocolate, making them super-sweet. The dough needed to be chilled for 5 hours before baking.

Now: We eliminated the flour to make this and gluten-free. We ditched the coating and added bittersweet chocolate chips and chopped walnuts to the batter for a richer flavor and texture. Our testing showed that there is no need for the chilling step, so now the recipe only takes 30 minutes start to finish!

Then: Processed cheese slices were dipped directly into the batter before cooking. The 1949 version included bran flake cereal for a crunchy texture. The original recipe called for these pancakes to be served without syrup.

Now: Instead of wrapped cheese, we opted for a rich, creamy ricotta to boost the flavor. We folded in whipped egg whites for a smooth and fluffy hotcake. Ours is topped with a vibrant blackberry-orange sauce, to make this a sweeter treat.

Then: The sauce didn't stick well to the elbow- shaped pasta. Originally, this dish needed to bake for 45 minutes after prep, making the total time almost 2 hours. The recipe called for pimiento cheese as the base of the sauce, making it taste processed.

Now: We used large shells to capture the cheesy goodness and add extra flavor to each bite. Putting the casserole under the broiler gives it a crusty, golden top and shaves over an hour of the total time. We sautéed fresh peppers, then added sour cream and cream cheese for a flavor upgrade.

Then: The old version was topped with meringue and needed to be served immediately. The original recipe called for a store-bought pie crust that required baking. In 1962, the mousse was set with gelatin, an ingredient that can be tricky to use.

Now: We finished ours with a chocolate whipped cream so the whole pie can be made up to one day ahead. We opted to make this a no-bake pie with a cookie crust, which shaves 30 minutes of the total time. For easier prep with fool- proof results, we melted marshmallows with chocolate.

Then: Upside-down cakes date back the the Middle Ages, but the pineapple version didn't become mainstream until 1925, when Dole Food Co. held a recipe contest to promote its exotic pineapple products. The cake gained popularity in the '50s when island fever swept through the U.S. and convenience items like canned fruit were trendy.

Today: We made individual Bundts, adding coconut milk to boxed cake mix for a tropical vibe. We also replaced the classic processed maraschino cherries with a fresh blueberry topping.

Then: These chocolate-covered creams became Cincinnati's signature sweet in the mid-19th century. The Bissinger family&mdashonce the official candymakers of the French Empire&mdashbrought them to Ohio after fleeing Paris before the Revolution of 1848. Other confectioners soon followed, sometimes adding nuts or coconut.

Now: Most early opera cream recipes required rolling out and coating each candy individually. Our version is easier and faster: We spread the cream on one large tray, topped it with chocolate, then cut it into bite-size squares. We also gave these treats a pop of color by folding in pistachios, and added a sprinkle of sea salt.

Then: Although not technically a pudding, this simple dessert gets its name from the Ozark region in the Midwest, where it originated. As it bakes, the nut-and-apple filled batter forms a crisp cookie crust over a gooey, pecan pie-like filling.

Now: When we made our 1975 version, it fell after baking&mdasha sign of too much baking powder&mdashso we halved the amount of today's recipe. We also folded in fresh blackberries and ginger to add a bit of tartness and spice, then saved some of the fruit and pecans for a pretty topping.

Then: While the original recipe for these cookies can be traced back to seventh-century Arabia, many countries have their own version. Since 1950, we've published a handful of these recipes with names like Mexican Wedding Cookies, Russian Teacakes and Viennese Crescents.

Now: Earlier recipes required grinding nuts and mixing dough by hand. Today, we sped things up with a food processor and let the nutty flavor stand out by cutting some sugar. We also swapped out the bitter walnuts of our 1961 version for oiler pecans, which help keep the cookies moist.


For the batter

  • 200g dark muscovado sugar
  • 175g butter , chopped
  • 700g luxury mixed dried fruit
  • 50g glacé cherries
  • 2 tsp grated fresh root ginger
  • 100ml dark rum , brandy or orange juice nuts, roughly chopped
  • 3large eggs , beaten
  • 85g ground almond
  • 200g plain flour
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 1 tsp cinnamon

For the icing

  • 400g pack ready-rolled marzipan (we used Dr Oetker) jam or shredless marmalade
  • 500g pack fondant icing sugar , for dusting

You will also need

Method

Tip the sugar, butter, dried fruit, whole cherries, ginger, orange zest and juice into a large pan. Pour over the rum, brandy or juice, then put on the heat and slowly bring to the boil, stirring frequently to melt the butter. Reduce the heat and bubble gently, uncovered for 10 mins, stirring every now and again to make sure the mixture doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pan. Set aside for 30 mins to cool.

Stir the nuts, eggs and ground almonds into the fruit, then sift in the flour, baking powder and spices. Stir everything together gently but thoroughly. Your batter is ready.

Heat oven to 150C/130C fan/gas 2. Scoop the cake mix into 12 deep muffin cases (an ice-cream scoop works well), then level tops with a spoon dipped in hot water. Bake for 35-45 mins until golden and just firm to touch. A skewer inserted should come out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

Unravel the marzipan onto a work surface lightly dusted with icing sugar. Stamp out 12 rounds, 6cm across. Brush the cake tops with apricot jam, top with a marzipan round and press down lightly.

Make up the fondant icing to a spreading consistency, then swirl on top of each cupcake. Decorate with sugared almonds and snowflakes, then leave to set. Will keep in a tin for 3 weeks.


Caribbean-style Christmas cake recipe

Fruity cake with ginger, prunes and dark rum, topped with caramelised fruit. A 23cm round silver cake board is nice for presentation purposes.

Ingredients

  • 2 oranges, zest only
  • 70 g glacé cherries, halved
  • 70 g stem ginger, chopped
  • 450 g mixed dried fruit, eg currants, sultanas, raisins
  • 100 g prunes, chopped
  • 150 g tropical fruit mix
  • 300 ml dark rum
  • 2 oranges, zest only
  • 2.5 oz glacé cherries, halved
  • 2.5 oz stem ginger, chopped
  • 15.9 oz mixed dried fruit, eg currants, sultanas, raisins
  • 3.5 oz prunes, chopped
  • 5.3 oz tropical fruit mix
  • 10.6 fl oz dark rum
  • 2 oranges, zest only
  • 2.5 oz glacé cherries, halved
  • 2.5 oz stem ginger, chopped
  • 15.9 oz mixed dried fruit, eg currants, sultanas, raisins
  • 3.5 oz prunes, chopped
  • 5.3 oz tropical fruit mix
  • 1.3 cups dark rum
  • 175 g margarine
  • 175 g muscovado sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 2 tbsp black treacle
  • 200 g plain flour, sieved together with 1 tsp mixed spice & 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 100 g whole almonds, roughly chopped
  • 6.2 oz margarine
  • 6.2 oz muscovado sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 2 tbsp black treacle
  • 7.1 oz plain flour, sieved together with 1 tsp mixed spice & 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 3.5 oz whole almonds, roughly chopped
  • 6.2 oz margarine
  • 6.2 oz muscovado sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 2 tbsp black treacle
  • 7.1 oz plain flour, sieved together with 1 tsp mixed spice & 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 3.5 oz whole almonds, roughly chopped
  • 450 g marzipan
  • 3 tbsp sieved apricot jam (use more if necessary
  • 500 g pack regalice
  • 15.9 oz marzipan
  • 3 tbsp sieved apricot jam (use more if necessary
  • 17.6 oz pack regalice
  • 15.9 oz marzipan
  • 3 tbsp sieved apricot jam (use more if necessary
  • 17.6 oz pack regalice
  • 1 handful fruits to caramelise, eg satsumas, redcurrants, grapes, cape gooseberries
  • 250 g granulated sugar
  • 4 tbsp water
  • 1 handful bay leaves
  • 1 handful fruits to caramelise, eg satsumas, redcurrants, grapes, cape gooseberries
  • 8.8 oz granulated sugar
  • 4 tbsp water
  • 1 handful bay leaves
  • 1 handful fruits to caramelise, eg satsumas, redcurrants, grapes, cape gooseberries
  • 8.8 oz granulated sugar
  • 4 tbsp water
  • 1 handful bay leaves

Details

  • Cuisine: Caribbean
  • Recipe Type: Cake
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 25 mins
  • Cooking Time: 180 mins
  • Serves: 24

Step-by-step

  1. A week before baking the cake, place all the &lsquosoak&rsquo ingredients in a Tupperware container. Mix well, cover and leave for one week, shaking the container each day.
  2. Place margarine and sugar in a large bowl and beat until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs one by one with the treacle. Finally fold in flour, spices, nuts and the soaked fruits.
  3. Place in a greased and double lined 20cm (8 inch) round cake tin. Smooth top with back of a wet metal spoon.
  4. Bake on middle shelf of preheated oven 150°C/140°C fan/gas mark 2. Look at cake after first 2 ½ hours, then at regular ½ hourly intervals until cooked. Allow to cool before removing from tin.
  5. To cover with marzipan: Brush the cake with apricot jam. Roll out the marzipan, with icing sugar to prevent sticking, into a circle large enough to cover the cake. Place over the cake and smooth over the top and sides. Trim edges.
  6. Allow marzipan to dry 48 hours before icing.
  7. Knead the white icing on a work surface dusted with icing sugar until soft and pliable. Roll out icing about 7.5cm (3 inches) larger all round than the top of the cake, place over cake and smooth over evenly until the cake is completely covered. Trim icing at bottom of cake.
  8. Dissolve the granulated sugar in the water over a low heat until dissolved. Bring to the boil and cook until the sugar turns a golden caramel colour. Dip fruits into the caramel and leave on baking parchment to cool.
  9. Decorate cake with caramelised fruits, bay leaves and tie a ribbon round if liked.

This recipe was devised by Sue Batty for Stork and Flora.

You might also like:

Comments

Do you want to comment on this article? You need to be signed in for this feature